Last of the Spooky Photos

Ron walking Sheba

Ron walking Sheba

I like this campground and love the campers we’ve met.  But I have had all the swamp I want to see for a while.  For that reason, I’ll be glad when we leave Thursday and head back to Gail’s  house for a few days.

Sinkhole

Sinkhole

I don’t know how I missed that the little Scotty trailer belongs to a camp host.  I talked with her today.  I asked what year model the trailer is.  She said 1962 is stamped on the tongue of the trailer, but her title says 1965.  It has always been in her family.  She bought it from her mother “15 or 20 years ago” for $800.  She said everything in it is original — even the cushions.  They were apparently made of extremely good foam because she says they are still springy and are not deteriorating.  I’m guessing it’s latex, based on that — although I would not expect even latex to last 50 years.

Another picture of the little Scotty -- with the clearly visible Camp Host sign that I missed before.  :)

Another picture of the little Scotty — with the clearly visible Camp Host sign that I missed before. :)

As for the surroundings here — swamps, sinkholes, and more swamps.  The nearby town, Marianna, is beautifully clean and well maintained, though.

I did feel a little spooked when we went to Walmart and saw several Middle Eastern men — and they were not smiling.  One had his wife (I guess) in a hijab with him.  (Or is it burqua?  It was all black, full body covering.)

Since I had never seen anyone actually wearing one, I took a long look at all I could see of her — her beautiful, expressive eyes.  Later I wished I had smiled into her eyes instead of curiously gawking.

Swamp 1

Swamp 1

 

Swamp 2

Swamp 2

Swamp 3

Swamp 3

The Star Party that Wasn’t, a Park Liner & Long Gray Hair!

Looks primeval, doesn't it?

Looks primeval, doesn’t it?

We heard about a star party at the visitor’s center around 6:30 this evening and were really looking forward to going.  But, due to overcast skies, it was canceled.  I hope they schedule another one while we are here.

Letting my hair grow.  I usually wear it up.

This is for Kim and Judie who know I am letting my gray hair grow long. I’m really loving it after decades of ultra short cuts.

Today was a leisurely day of chatting with other campers and meandering walks.  While we were out, we met a nice couple from Pennsylvania, Tina and Sam, camping in a 15′ Park Liner.  Park Liner is the latest manufacturer that I am aware of to build molded fiberglass trailers.

I was so excited when I saw the Park Liner that I asked Tina if I could take photos.  She graciously consented.  I apologize that my camera didn’t do it justice.  It doesn’t do well in low light conditions and gave the pictures an odd color cast.  But you can still see the layout.

The Park Liner exterior.  I love the wood, residential style screen door.

The Park Liner exterior. I love the wood, residential style screen door.

I have found (and sampled) all kinds of good edible plants and trail nibbles here.  But since I haven’t stayed intensively committed to it, I have forgotten many of the plants’ names.

I’ve decided to start brushing on on both the edible plants and mushroom skills.  Especially while we are essentially living in the Casita  (temporarily, of course), it helps to have an absorbing hobby to focus on.  It keeps life new and exciting.

Large comfortable bed in the Park Liner, which can become another dinette.  I apologize for the color cast my camera gave it.

Large comfortable bed in the Park Liner, which can become another dinette. I apologize for the color cast my camera gave it.

I am surprised at the number of families with young children that are camping here in tents and popups, considering the cold nights we are having.  I love to see them enjoying campfires and outdoor pursuits.  Those are memories that will last!

Another view of the Park Liner interior.

Another view of the Park Liner interior.

A tiny 13' Scamp is camped next to the Park Liner.

A tiny 13′ Scamp is camped next to the Park Liner.

Nightfall in the campground.

Nightfall in the campground.

These little flowers are blooming all over the place, unfazed by the below freezing weather the  night before last.

These little flowers are blooming all over the place, unfazed by the below freezing weather the night before last.

Swamp Swimming?

This was the free daily jigsaw puzzle in my puzzle app last night.  It describes the weather here perfectly!

This was the free daily jigsaw puzzle in my puzzle app last night. It describes the weather here perfectly!

 

Our Casita at Florida Caverns State Park

Our casita at Florida Caverns State Park

Last night was the first night in Florida that we seriously worried about our water freezing.  I ran the propane furnace instead of the AC’s heat strip.  I pulled out all of our underbed storage and opened all the lower cupboard doors so the heat could reach the water pipes.  I also left the bathroom door open so heat could keep the pipes behind the shower pan from freezing.  It worked!  Thank heavens that no more temperatures that cold are predicted!

Entrance to swimming area

Entrance to swimming area

Ron and I have decided not to do the cave tour.  Many years ago I toured some huge caves (maybe Luray — can’t remember.  It was the one with the rock formation in it that looks like two poached eggs), but they were huge and felt more like cathedrals than caves.

These caves are a lot smaller.  I was told there is some crouching down required in some places.  Just the thought of it triggers claustrophobia.  So we’ll just enjoy the above-ground sights — which is mainly a lot of eerily beautiful swampland.  So glad it’s not mosquito weather!

Another shot of the swimming area

Another shot of the swimming area

A nice thing about this park is that it is near stores and fast food places.

Also, important to me, they do allow clotheslines.  In fact they have clothesline poles at each site — to keep people from using trees.  So if I decided to use my laundry drying rack behind the trailer, it shouldn’t cause problems.  I probably won’t, though, because they have laundry facilities here.

Swimming area.  You can tell I was boggled at the swampy swimming!

Swimming area. You can tell I was boggled at the swampy swimming!

Sheba is embarrassing me!  There are several other people here with large dogs.  They are all so sweet and friendly.  And they don’t bark at other dogs.  Sheba still has to sound the alarm and try to intimidate any other dog she sees.  It makes me feel inadequate as a doggie mom!

This place is not big rig friendly, so there are lots of tiny campers, along with several medium sized rigs.  Next to us and across the street are two matching teardrops.  Ron said they are two single women, each with their own teardrop, traveling together.  I said hi to one of them and she didn’t answer, so I’ll have to take Ron’s word for that.

Final swimming area photo

Final swimming area photo

About the swimming area….  I don’t think I’d want to swim in a cypress swamp.  Even if the weather permitted!  But it’s gorgeous viewing.

And, as at Newport Park, the ground is covered with little violets.

A little Scotty trailer

A little Scotty trailer

One of the twin teardrops

One of the twin teardrops

This photo is the last one I took at Newport Park.  I liked it enough to insert it here.  :)

This photo is the last one I took at Newport Park. I liked it enough to insert it here. :)

I found a place to store my drying rack.  :)

I found a place to store my drying rack. :)

Little violets

Little violets

Bridge built around trees

Bridge built around trees

 

 

 

 

The Pinta and the Nina

The Pinta's rigging

The Pinta’s rigging

I love boats and ships.  In fact, the white noise that I use to help me fall asleep most night is an app that has a boat sounds selection.  The creaking of the ropes and the lapping of the water against the hull make me feel like I am being rocked to sleep.

Entrance to the Nina's Captain's cabin

Entrance to the Nina’s Captain’s cabin

So I was really looking forward to touring replicas of the Nina and the Pinta.  (Drives me crazy not having the proper key for the Spanish character in Nina).  :)

But the crowds were too large and moved too fast for me to get the feel of life aboard the ships.  I learned how the crew hoisted the heavy anchor.  I learned how they steered without a wheel.  And I learned that, with the available instruments in the 1490’s, they could determine longitude but not latitude.  Their time pieces weren’t accurate enough.  For instance, if the sand in your hour glass got damp and started clumping, you were out of luck.

View through the grate covering the Nina's cargo hold.

View through the grate covering the Nina’s cargo hold.

But I couldn’t go down into the cargo hold and see where horses (must have been small Spanish horses) were hoisted down into and kept with slings around their bellies for support so they wouldn’t break their legs on one of the Nina’s voyages.  I couldn’t go into the captain’s cabin with a 4′ high ceiling and no ventilation except the grate over the entrance.  And although they told us where the crews slept, I don’t remember because I didn’t experience the spaces.

Provisions cask

Provisions cask

So I’m glad I went.  I saw both ships, but I still don’t know them.

There was a sign saying they needed crew members.  Ron told me I should sign on as ship’s cook.  If I were younger and healthier, I would probably do just that.  At least I would KNOW how Columbus and his crews felt on their long voyages into the unknown.

Well, I wouldn’t know the unknown part, but I would know the ships!

The tiller attached to the rudder was used to steer the ship.

The tiller attached to the rudder was used to steer the ship.

BTW, the smaller Nina was my favorite of the two ships.  It was Columbus’s favorite, too.

Rope that was too worn to use for rigging was used to make bumpers.

Rope that was too worn to use for rigging was used to make bumpers.

Model showing the ships' structure.

Model showing the ships’ structure.

Here's your chance, wannabe sailors!

Here’s your chance, wannabe sailors!

 

Doing Laundry in a Casita

Three loads of Wonder Wash laundry on drying rack bungeed to Casita tongue.

Three loads of Wonder Wash laundry on drying rack bungeed to Casita tongue.

Ron and I have had enough bad laundromat experiences to make us want to come up with a better idea.  And I believe that we have.

The Wonder Wash in use

The Wonder Wash in use

We will still use laundromats when they are available, reliable and clean.  But using mildewy washers and out-of-order or rusty dryers is now a thing of the past.

I started with a manual Wonder Wash.  I have one at home, but since I couldn’t get to it, I ordered a new one to use just for camping.  I also had a smaller spin dryer that Laundry Alternative used to carry.  But it is out of stock now and may not be available again.

The Nina spin dryer is a lot larger than I expected.  At first I was tempted to send it back, but I am so glad I didn’t.  It holds jeans, towels, sheets, etc. without a qualm, and is so quiet I wonder sometimes if it is running.  It spins at 1800 rpms and gets clothes a lot dryer than my washer’s spin cycle at home.  So they dry fast since they are just damp when you hang them up.

The Nina Spin Dryer

The Nina Spin Dryer

The Wonder Wash can be used while boondocking.  But the spin dryer needs electricity.  And since hand-wringing is the hardest part of doing laundry by hand, I would only use it when we have hookups.

You will read reviews all over the board at Amazon.  Some people say the Wonder Wash is fantastic (as I do).  Some say it does nothing and after you use it you end up with wet, dirty clothes.

I believe both views are correct because the results are solely dependent on the way you use the Wonder Wash.  The directions say to spin the tub one turn per second.  At that rate, laundry falls from top to bottom and from bottom to top each turn.  If you spin it faster, centrifugal force will keep the clothes in one place — and you will end up with wet, dirty laundry.

Clothes out of the spinner --ready to hang to dry.

Clothes out of the spinner –ready to hang to dry.

If you turn it at the recommended speed for two minutes, the clothes fall from top to bottom and from bottom to top and are slammed through the hot, soapy water each time.  Even without the “pressurized soap and water being forced through the clothes” that the ad touts, dunking clothes that many times in hot soapy water does a great job cleaning them.

I don’t use the handle.  It’s hard work.  Instead I just spin the tub on its axis, pulling the lid toward me, and then using the drain pipe mount as a handle to keep the spin going.  It’s as close to effortless as manual laundry can be.

Water comes out of the spinner fast!  I don't have a bowl large enough to hold the water, so I quickly switch to a second pot when the first one is almost filled.

Water comes out of the spinner fast! I don’t have a bowl large enough to hold the water, so I quickly switch to a second pot when the first one is almost filled.

When I first got my Casita, I wanted to make it the prettiest little camper ever.  And I loved the way it turned out.  But as we actually use the trailer, beauty is giving way to what works for us.

I had already modified our camper to have twin beds instead of a double bed and dinette.  My dinette idea was very pretty, but not too practical.  Ron uses the little round table for his tablet and man cave stuff, so I always eat off a tray sitting on my bed.  Since we weren’t using the table as a dinette, I removed the cushions by his bed and stuffed them into the closet, freeing up space to leave my “laundry room” set up permanently.  I do plan to put attractive small rugs underneath the washer and spinner to keep the bare white fiberglass seats from showing.

These pictures are out of order.  I rinse clothes from the washer in the sink or in a large bucket.  Some clothes require only one rinse.  Most require two.  And really dirty ones where I used a lot of soap require three rinses.

These pictures are out of order. I rinse clothes from the washer in the sink or in a large bucket. Some clothes require only one rinse. Most require two. And really dirty ones where I used a lot of soap require three rinses.

Hopefully this will help me spend a few minutes each day or two doing a small load and keep laundry from piling up.

Disclaimer — I have no connection with the sellers of these machines — except as a happy customer.

Heavy duty folding dryer rack bungeed to trailer.  Usually the bumper, but the way our site is situated, the front is away from the road.

Heavy duty folding dryer rack bungeed to trailer. Usually the bumper, but the way our site is situated, the front is away from the road.

 

A Mini Post

It's been a while since I've seen an old fire tower.

It’s been a while since I’ve seen an old fire tower.

…A mini post as far as content today.

We didn’t see the ships today.  Ron was sick and spent most of the day in bed.  I am not feeling great, either.  It didn’t help that it was really cold today.

Another wonderful old tree.

Another wonderful old tree.

So I just walked Sheba around the park, and that was the extent of our adventures.  Except for the price shock of the little country grocery store we stocked up at this evening.  WOW!

But the refrigerator and freezer are packed, so we are good for a week or so.

Tomorrow is supposed to be up in the 60’s and sunny.  Probably it would be a good day for visiting the Pinta and Nina.  But we have decided to wait until the weekend crowd is over.  The ships will be here until the 23rd.  So we’ll wait for a warm, sunny day during the week.

I love rock scaping!

I love rock scaping!

I was thrilled to see two kinds of tiny wild violets blooming all over the campground today.

Also tomorrow is laundry day.  I have a new laundry system that I tried out at Gail’s house, and it’s a perfect solution to being where laundromats are not available or are not clean.

It’s a Wonder Wash and a spin dryer that gets the clothes damp dry.  (I also have a Wonder Wash at home for power outages and love it.) And I have a wooden rack I’ll secure to the trailer as unobtrusively as possible to dry them on.  I’ll show you how it works out tomorrow.  :)

 

I’ll close with some sweet little violet pictures:

violet3

violet2

violet4

 

Newport Campground

At Newport Park

Ron talking with the sweet camp host at Newport Park. Sunny is visible in the Casita door if you look closely. :)

We just spent a wonderful week driveway camping at Gail’s, grilling ribs and steaks and eating way too much good food.

The front of the park facing the county road.

The front of the park facing the county road.

This evening we are at Newport Park, a sleepy little campground near Crawfordville, Florida.  This park is near the Gulf after Florida curves back in from the Panhandle.  So it’s only 90 miles from Live Oak.

The river offers fishing and boating, and there is a wildlife observation area across the road.   There are several large dogs here.  Since Sheba won’t quit barking at them, she is on restriction inside the camper.  To her, that’s a fate worse than death!

Walkway over the swamp to the river observation deck

Walkway over the swamp to the river observation deck

Replicas of the Pinta and Nina are supposed to pull into nearby St. Marks tomorrow.  I would love to go see them.  I guess we’ll put the dogs in the truck and try to find a shaded spot for them.  Since Sunny has lost part of his little mind, we can’t leave him in the trailer and go places anymore.  He yips hysterically the whole time we are gone.   So far, he will still stay in the truck with Sheba without causing a commotion.

Fish cleaning station

Fish cleaning station

This campground is way out in the boonies of the old Florida.  Oddly enough, my paternal grandmother lived in this area when she was young, but it is the first time we’ve been here.

I was afraid we’d be without a cell signal as I watched it disappear the closer we got to our campground.  But I am relieved to discover that we get 2-3 bars here, which is enough for phone calls and uploading pictures.

St. Marks River

St. Marks River

We plan to stay here a week, then head for Florida Caverns State Park.  We are still just making our itinerary up as we go along.

And loving it!

The bridge.  There are signs offering a reward for reporting a tagged striped bass.

The bridge. There are signs offering a reward for reporting a tagged striped bass.

 

 

 

At the Springs

Looking from the swimming area toward where it joins the river.

Looking from the swimming area toward where it joins the river.

We broke the rules today.  We left our dogs in the truck while we strolled around the day use area.  We decided that just because someone made a rule because someone in the past might have left their dogs in a hot car in the sun in summer, it was silly to apply that rule to dogs in a deeply shaded truck when the high was in the 60’s.

One of the deep vents where 72 degree waterboils out from the aquifer.

One of the deep vents where 72 degree water boils out from the aquifer. There is no vegetation next to the vent. That’s the reflections of overhead trees.

So that’s my excuse, officer!  :D

The water is so crystal clear here that you can look through it and see every grain of sand on the bottom.

The swimming area is shallow.  You can walk the whole area, except for where the vents are.  A few hardy souls were swimming when we got to the day use area.  Obviously they are from somewhere a lot colder than here.  We would have frozen!

Despite the name, the water does not taste salty.

We had a wonderful visit with Linda and Marty yesterday.  The day was balmy enough for us to be outside.  When we got tired of sitting, we took Sheba for a long walk.  Marty is undergoing radiation treatment so was not as chipper as usual.  But he was his usual sweet, friendly self.

We will be leaving here Wednesday.  The time has flown!  I’m looking forward to some more family time.  We’ll stay at Mom’s for a night, then head to Gail’s where we will homestead for a few days.  :)

I had several more photos I wanted to share with you, but my signal is so poor that it is giving me http errors every time I try to upload another one. So I’ll accept the inevitable and sign off now.

Reconnecting

Same spot, another bird.

Same spot, another bird.

I took this photo in the same place I took the egret photo yesterday.  This bird was gray instead of white.  I’m awful at bird names, but maybe this was a blue heron?  He took off before I could get close enough to get a good shot.  And I was too slow to catch him in flight.

A view from the outdoor dining area.

A view from the outdoor dining area.

We met with my cousin Teresa at Castaways in Astor, about a half hour from here for lunch. I was wondering if I would even recognize her because I have only seen her once (that I remember) as a adult.  But there was no mistaking the big, welcoming wave from her as she got out of her car!  She has beautiful auburn hair, blue eyes, and creamy-looking skin.  And she gives great bear hugs!  :)

We elected to eat outside on the floating dock.  It moved with the waves and felt like we were on a boat.

Ron and I had the blackened fish salad.  I am leery of ordering blackened fish because so few do it right — but this place had it down pat.  It was great!

Castaways is a dog friendly restaurant.  You can take your dogs in the outside eating areas.  But I knew if I had both dogs with me, I would be so preoccupied with them that I couldn’t take full advantage of visiting with Teresa.  So I left them in the car in a palm-shaded parking spot.

After we finished a long, leisurely lunch, I took her out to meet the dogs.  I opened the truck door — and Sheba bolted out of the truck like lightning and raced toward the buildings.  I couldn’t whistle, so I screamed “SHEBA!!!!!” but she ignored me.  Just as I was planning to put Sunny down and go chase Sheba, she reappeared at the truck as quickly as she had disappeared.  I told her, “Get in the truck!” and she went in like a bullet.

It dawned on me that she probably had gotten a bad case of cabin fever waiting for us in the truck and just needed to stretch her muscles.

The floating dining area.

The floating dining area.

Teresa lives in Florida now, so I hope we will do better at keeping in touch than we have in the past.  She also loves hiking and has done several of the trails in the area.

I completely forgot about taking pictures in the excitement of meeting up with her.  Then, as we were leaving, I did remember to shoot a couple of shots of the area.  But Teresa didn’t want her picture taken, and I don’t blame her.  I don’t like mine taken much either!  :)

Salt Springs, FL

Fishing buddies

Fishing buddies

I was surprised to see an egret calmly scouting for fish next to the fisherman.  They did look like they appreciated each others company.  The egret let Sheba and I approach fairly closely, but then started getting a little agitated.  So I moved around him in a wide arc, and when I looked back, he was searching for fish again.

This man and his wife are camping with a cat, dog, and 22 year old bird.

This man and his wife are camping with a cat, dog, and 22 year old bird.

We have camped at Salt Springs 3 or 4 times before, but when we drove into the park this time its beauty really struck me.  I had forgotten how pretty it is.

We have been unable to go to the day use area and springs this time.  When we were here before, we could leave the dogs in the truck in the shaded parking lot while we explored.  But now, in addition to rules against leaving pets unattended, and no pets in the day use area, there is a new one forbidding leaving them in vehicles.   Maybe Ron and I will take turns pet sitting  so we can enjoy it one at a time.

Our site

Our site

Nevertheless, we are loving being here.  We had a couple of chilly days, but now it’s up in the mid 60’s again.  Wonderful walking weather!

We are planning to have lunch with my cousin tomorrow, then friends from Silver Springs are coming to visit us Sunday.  I’m looking forward to both visits!

Bird prints in sand

Bird prints in sand

There are 6 camp hosts here.  The others have big rigs.  One has this little not-quite-restored vintage trailer.  :)

There are 6 camp hosts here. The others have big rigs. One has this little not-quite-restored vintage trailer. :)

This is as close as we can get to the spring area with our dogs.

This is as close as we can get to the spring area with our dogs.

One more picture of Sunny sleeping on his "binky."

One more picture of Sunny sleeping on his “binky.”

There are still things blooming -- even in January!

There are still things blooming — even in January! I’m not sure what the red things are.

 

Cell service is almost non-existent here.  Sometimes we can’t get on the net at all.  Sometimes we can send text emails.  And once in a while we get two bars and can upload photos.  Apparently there is wifi available at the office because I saw 4 campers working on laptops when we checked in.

 

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